The uv5r doesn't have the best reputation for spectral purity, let's see how this one does...

We're measuring conducted emissions, so lets cable a spectrum analyzer into the antenna socket. There's a 10dB pad too, just to protect the analyzer.

Putting a marker on the carrier, and delta markers on the harmonics it's easy to see their relative levels:

145MHz, high power145MHz, lower power
435MHz, high power435MHz, lower power

Summarizing, and adding 11dB to account for the 10dB attenuator, and cable loss, which I didn't measure:

frequency_Hz power p1_dBm d2_dBc d3_dBc d4_dBc d5_dBc
0 145000000.0 high 36.22 -52.19 -48.61 -71.77 -67.32
1 145000000.0 low 29.40 -58.08 -44.57 -65.02 -65.16
2 435000000.0 high 34.18 -60.66 -44.76 -62.71 -68.49
3 435000000.0 low 28.82 -47.54 -42.43 -59.03 -66.66

None of the harmonics are above the FCC limit (-40dBc) which is a good start (ofcom's regulations on off-frequency emissions are not so helpfully precise).

Looking at the absolute powers of the harmonics, the worst is at -10.6dBm, and all of the third harmonics are greater than the FCC limit of -16dBm. Measurement uncertainty here is pretty large, but not enough to cover a fail by several dB.

frequency_Hz power p1_dBm p2_dBm p3_dBm p4_dBm p5_dBm
0 145000000.0 high 36.22 -15.97 -12.39 -35.55 -31.10
1 145000000.0 low 29.40 -28.68 -15.17 -35.62 -35.76
2 435000000.0 high 34.18 -26.48 -10.58 -28.53 -34.31
3 435000000.0 low 28.82 -18.72 -13.61 -30.21 -37.84